The House I Never Knew (Work-in-Progress)

Director: Randall Dottin
Documentary Features :: Voices
Event Date(s)
1:45 PM
Friday, November 15
Jengo's Playhouse
Credits:

Producers: Randall Dottin, Angela Tucker, Cynthia Kobel

The House I Never Knew is a six-part documentary series that will chronicle the lives of people struggling to fight against the negative effects of housing segregation policy. From episode to episode we’ll conduct incisive interviews, showcase scenes with our main characters, use archival footage for historical context as well as show community stakeholders who have decided to remain and contribute to the health and well-being of their neighborhoods. Housing segregation policy concentrates poverty and exacerbates social ills like gun violence and educational failure. The doc-series will showcase how these government policies have specifically affected the eco-systems of three cities: Chicago, Houston and Boston. Each episode we’ll ask the questions: Who gets to live in American cities? If our government created these policies what is its responsibility to create solutions? Who gets to take advantage of the innovation and access to resources that cities bring to its citizens? In the America that we’re creating, will your zip code at birth determine your destiny? Creator and host, Randy Dottin guides the viewer as we try to find the answers.

Works-in-Progress Lab / Cucalorus 2019

Bio

Randall Dottin grew up in Boston and received his bachelor’s degree in Film from Dartmouth College and an MFA from Columbia University School of the Arts Graduate Series Division. His thesis film, “A-Alike”, was licensed for a two-year broadcast run by HBO in 2003 and has won numerous awards and distinctions including: the DGA Award for Best African-American Student Filmmaker and the Gold Medal at the 2004 Student Academy Awards for Best Narrative Film. In 2007, Randall completed “Lifted”, sponsored by Fox Searchlight’s program for emerging directors, the Fox Searchlab. In March 2009, Randall was named by INDIEWIRE Magazine as one of the Top Ten New Voices in Black Cinema.