Lumbee Film Festival

The 3rd annual Lumbee Film Festival takes place July 1-5, 2020. The festival showcases bold, original new films made by Native Americans, Indigenous Filmmakers, and American Indians, especially members of the Lumbee Tribe living in North Carolina and across the United States.

“It is wonderful to have an opportunity for the community to come for free to see films made for and by American Indians, amplifying our voices, our challenges and our accomplishments,” – Kim Pevia, Festival Director 

For questions about the Lumbee Film Festival, email boxoffice@cucalorus.org.

To view the 3rd annual Lumbee Film Festival Program Guide, click here!

To download a PDF of the Lumbee Film Festival poster, click here!

2020 Schedule:

STORIES WE TELL | Thursday, July 2 @ 8pm

Totems | The House Tour | You Love Who You Love | Jhana | Portrait Of An Artist | Caenis or Caeneus?

THE PAST ENSURES OUR FUTURE | Friday, July 3 @ 8pm

Now Is the Time | Zibi Yajdan / The River Tells It | Weaving our paths | SKY AELANS (Sky Islands)

FEATURE | Saturday, July 4 @ 8pm

Another Scar of Genocide: Diabetes in Indian Country

CLOSING NIGHT FEATURE | Sunday, July 5 @ 6pm

maɬni – towards the ocean, towards the shore

2020 Lumbee Program

Youth Making Their Way | Wednesday, July 1 | 8:00pm

“Keep My Memory”

Alexis Raeana Jones, Matthew Ruprich | 3:45

Music video for Alexis Raeana’s debut single “Keep My Memory”, a story of rebirth and a voice for the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women movement (MMIW).

Read the Filmmaker's bio

An enrolled tribal member of The Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina, Alexis Raeana defies the odds. From the swamps of rural Robeson County, Alexis has always called Pembroke “home”. Alexis held the title of Miss Lumbee in 2015, since then she has graduated from the University of North Carolina At Wilmington with a bachelors degree in Environmental Science and a concentration in Conservation and Geospatial informations systems. Appeared on last seasons American idol where she got the golden ticket to Hollywood. Alexis currently runs her own business Alexis Raeana LLC , which provides elite entertainment, makeup artistry, modeling, public speaking and several other services. Alexis  is the North Carolina Eastern Youth organizer for the alliance for climate education. She recently debuted her new single “Keep My Memory” featuring Charly Lowry available now on all music streaming platforms. 

Native and American

Taylor Hensel, Brit Hensel | 16:04

Native and American follows Holly Spaude as she confronts her mixed heritage and seeks to define her identity within her tribal community.

Read the Filmmaker's bio

Taylor Hensel is a documentary journalist and filmmaker who seeks perspective at the intersection of culture and environment. Taylor belongs to the Kituwah people (Cherokee Nation). She is a co-founder of Selu Productions and is a 2019 Big Sky Native Filmmaker Initiative Fellow and a 4th World Media Lab Fellow. She earned her BA in Journalism from Metropolitan State University of Denver and holds an MA in Documentary Journalism from the University of Missouri. She has worked as a journalist and video producer independently as well as with the US Department of the Interior and the Humane Society of the United States where her work involved covering stories about animal justice, environmental conservation, as well as the relationship between Indigenous peoples and the land. Taylor continues to align her life and her work valuing the land, justice, and diverse voices through her work as an Associate Producer with Nia Tero Foundation.   Brit’s passion for storytelling first took shape through her work as a journalist and screenwriter. She began visual storytelling through Selu Productions, founded by herself and her sister, Taylor. As a documentary filmmaker, her work often focuses on environmental justice and indigenous storytelling. Brit belongs to the Kituwah people and is an enrolled tribal citizen of the Cherokee Nation. She has a BA in History from North Park University in Chicago, Illinois. She is a 2019 NeXt Doc Fellow and currently works as a producer for Osiyo, Voices of the Cherokee People, an Emmy-winning, documentary-style program featuring the people, places, history, and culture of the Cherokee Nation.

Hard Learning

Daniel Fortin | 6:51

With no secondary school in her community, Grade 9 student Miranda must leave her family and home behind in order to pursue a high school education.

Read the Filmmaker's bio

A multi faceted Metis/Mi’kmaq artist, Daniel has spent a decade learning most aspects of TV and Film. Founding his own production company, he recently produced and directed the unique 13 part documentary series ‘Merchants of the Wild’ for APTN airing in Feb. 2019, and recently released a CBC Short Doc titled “Hard Learning”. He is in post production for the Mi’kmaq language film “Puktew Muin” and goes to camera producing the feature film “Prima Ballerinas” in Cuba this spring. His commitment continues to lay with Indigenous stories and culture while growing his own knowledge base. His short films have screened dozens of times internationally including screenings at WAFF, ImagineNative and Montreal First Peoples Film Festival.

Little Chief

Erica Tremblay | 11:40

Against the landscape of a rural reservation in Oklahoma, the lives of a Native woman and nine-year-old boy intersect over the course of a school day.

Read the Filmmaker's bio

Erica Tremblay is a Native American documentary filmmaker and activist currently studying her Indigenous language at Six Nations of the Grand River Reserve in Ontario. Her projects have screened at 60+ film festivals and her work has been featured on PBS, CNN and the Independent Film Channel. Erica’s films explore topics including violence against Indigenous women, restorative justice and issues impacting the two-spirit community. She has worked with many grassroots organizations, including the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center, the Alaska Native Women’s Coalition and the Monument Quilt Project. Erica was recently honored as a 40 Under 40 Native American and received a 2018 Sundance Native Film Lab Fellowship.

Puktew Muin (Fire Bear)

Daniel Fortin | 8:13

Uncle shares the Mi’kmaq story of Skus and Muin, at a camp fire with his niece and nephew. As they listen, their imaginations take over and turn the story into their own interpretation of what is happening, with them playing the lead characters.

Read the Filmmaker's bio

A multi-faceted Indigenous artist, Daniel has spent a decade learning most aspects of TV and Film. Founding his own production company, he recently produced and directed the unique 13 part documentary series ‘Merchants of the Wild’ for APTN, having aired in Feb. 2019 to great reviews, and recently released a CBC Short Doc titled “Hard Learning”. He is in post production for the Mi’kmaq language film “Puktew Muin” and is currently exploring two feature films in Colombia this winter as well as co-writing an adaptation of the novel “The Kings Daughter” by Suzanne Martel. His commitment continues to lay with Indigenous stories and culture while growing his own knowledge base. His short films have screened dozens of times internationally including screenings at WAFF, ImagineNative, Montreal First Peoples Film Festival, Regina International Film Festival and Whistler Film Festival.

Stories We Tell | Thursday, July 2 | 8:00pm

Totems

Justin Deegan | 14:00

A post-apocalyptic film about two Indigenous men existing in the aftermath of colonial America.  When their spouses kick them out, making them homeless in 2019 Seattle.  Just like in the old days.

Read the Filmmaker's bio

Justin Deegan is Arikara Sahnish, Oglala Lakota, Hunkpapa Dakota, and an enrolled citizen of the Mandan, Hidatsa & Arikara Nation. He was raised on the plains of North Dakota. Justin never intended to be a filmmaker. He caught the acting bug after being cast as, Chief Bromden, for the stage play, “One Flew Over The Cuckoos Nest,” Fargo Community Theater in Fargo, North Dakota. Justin received wide acclaim for his performance and was encouraged to audition for films by the Director, Larry Schwarz, of Cuckoos Nest. Later he auditioned for a short film and landed a role, however, they shot the film without him. Which, is where he knew in order to guarantee a movie role, he would have to create those movie roles. So, he decided to make his own movies. TOTEMS, is Justin’s second short film followed up by his first, ABOUT THAT LIFE. Both projects were originally composed and written by Deegan. ANOTHER SCAR OF GENOCIDE, is Justin’s first full feature. Deegan has had the many opportunities to work for Pharrell William’s and his Adidas HUMAN clothing line. Justin also worked on JOHN LEGENDS music video, LOVE ME NOW, Standing Rock portion of the video production.

The House Tour

Evan Ramseur | 2:54

A day and night in a spirited house.

Read the Filmmaker's bio

Evan Ramseur is a member of the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina, a resident of Davidson, North Carolina, and member/president of his local high schools film club, which he founded. He has twice participated in UNCSA’s Summer Film Intensive, helping produce, act, write and direct multiple projects. He stresses artistic unity in the Native community, as through art, humanity cannot and will not be divided.

You Love Who You Love

Ryan Craig, Javier Morin, Jr. | 11:48

A tragic love story about a relationship trying to overcome the distractions and obstacles of a fast life on the Yakama Indian Reservation.

Read the Filmmaker's bio

Ryan Craig is an enrolled member of the Yakama Indian Nation. He has directed two documentary films, ‘Wapato Rising 877’ and ‘Family’ as well as one short film titled ‘Guardian Ancestor’. Craig has been employed by Yakama Nation Radio for over 14 years. He is also the founding member of the award winning HipHop group Rezhogs.

Jhana

Evan Ramseur | 3:37

A spiritual look at art.

Read the Filmmaker's bio

Evan Ramseur is a member of the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina, a resident of Davidson, North Carolina, and member/president of his local high schools film club, which he founded. He has twice participated in UNCSA’s Summer Film Intensive, helping produce, act, write and direct multiple projects. He stresses artistic unity in the Native community, as through art, humanity cannot and will not be divided.

Portrait Of An Artist

Evan Ramseur | 6:47

A sampling of different paintings, music, and images to create a unified film.

Read the Filmmaker's bio

Evan Ramseur is a member of the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina, a resident of Davidson, North Carolina, and member/president of his local high schools film club, which he founded. He has twice participated in UNCSA’s Summer Film Intensive, helping produce, act, write and direct multiple projects. He stresses artistic unity in the Native community, as through art, humanity cannot and will not be divided.

Caenis or Caeneus?

Keith Carter | 2:55

Is Caenis of Lapith a woman? Or is she a man? Or quite possibly… both? You decide. Caenis or Caeneus? A Greek tale of subdued reality.

Read the Filmmaker's bio

Keith Carter, the director/creator of the independent feature Orlok The Vampire in 3D, is a Native American of Coharie descent. In the early 90s, Mr. Carter began a career in animation with a D.C.-based studio called News In Motion. While working with such clientele as Lucas Films, Disney, NFL and Marvel Entertainment, Mr. Carter developed his craft for animated storytelling. Keith Carter is also the Emmy Award-winning co-creator of Savings Man for ABC.

The Past Ensures Our Future | Friday, July 3 | 8:00pm

Now Is the Time

Christopher Auchter | 16:00

Internationally renowned Haida carver Robert Davidson carved the first new totem pole on British Columbia’s Haida Gwaii in almost a century when he was only 22 years old. The pole’s raising in August 1969 is captured through stunning archival footage to commemorate the rebirth of the Haida spirit.

Read the Filmmaker's bio

Christopher Auchter grew up roaming the beaches and forests of the Haida Gwaii archipelago off Canada’s West Coast, and his art is rooted in the land and stories of the Haida people. His art practice is fuelled by his close connection to the natural environment, his adventures in forestry and commercial fishing, and the colourful people with whom he has lived and worked. He began using images to capture his feelings and impressions early on in his life, and today his filmmaking serves the same function.  Auchter studied media arts at the Emily Carr University of Art and Design in Vancouver and graduated with honours in computer animation from Sheridan College in Ontario. His goal is to create films that are as engaging and entertaining as the many people and environments that have inspired him, to help facilitate genuine contact between the Haida people and the global community.  Auchter’s directing debut was the multi-award-winning animated short The Mountain of SGaana. His previous projects include Daniel Janke’s How People Got Fire, Electronic Arts’ NHL Games and Nintendo’s Punch Out!, and he is a regular contributor to Loretta Todd’s TV series for children, such as Coyote Science and Tansi! Nehiyawetan. He has illustrated three children’s books, including Jordan Wheeler’s Just a Walk, a comic book by Richard Van Camp called Kiss Me Deadly, and a graphic novel by W.L. Liberman entitled The Ruptured Sky: The War of 1812.

Zibi Yajdan / The River Tells It

Brit Hensel, Taylor Hensel | 8:01

Zibi Yajdan tells the story of the Kalamazoo River and her relationship to the Match-E-Be-Nash-She-Wish Pottawatomi people (Gun Lake Tribe) in the wake of the Enbridge Pipeline 6B oil spill.

Read the Filmmaker's bio

Taylor Hensel is a documentary journalist and filmmaker who seeks perspective at the intersection of culture and environment. Taylor belongs to the Kituwah people (Cherokee Nation). She is a co-founder of Selu Productions and is a 2019 Big Sky Native Filmmaker Initiative Fellow and a 4th World Media Lab Fellow. She earned her BA in Journalism from Metropolitan State University of Denver and holds an MA in Documentary Journalism from the University of Missouri. She has worked as a journalist and video producer independently as well as with the US Department of the Interior and the Humane Society of the United States where her work involved covering stories about animal justice, environmental conservation, as well as the relationship between Indigenous peoples and the land. Taylor continues to align her life and her work valuing the land, justice, and diverse voices through her work as an Associate Producer with Nia Tero Foundation.  Brit’s passion for storytelling first took shape through her work as a journalist and screenwriter. She began visual storytelling through Selu Productions, founded by herself and her sister, Taylor. As a documentary filmmaker, her work often focuses on environmental justice and indigenous storytelling. Brit belongs to the Kituwah people and is an enrolled tribal citizen of the Cherokee Nation. She has a BA in History from North Park University in Chicago, Illinois. She is a 2019 NeXt Doc Fellow and currently works as a producer for Osiyo, Voices of the Cherokee People, an Emmy-winning, documentary-style program featuring the people, places, history, and culture of the Cherokee Nation.

Tecendo nossos caminhos (Weaving our paths)

Cledson Kanunxi, Jackson Xinunxi e Marta Tipuici | 5:40

Only six elders of the Manoki population in the Brazilian Amazon still speak their indigenous language, an imminent risk of losing this important dimension of their ways of existence.

Read the Filmmakers' bios

We are indigenous from Manoki people, living in Brazilian Amazon, and all of us are beginners in filmmaking who decided to tell our histories, otherwise nobody else will.

SKY AELANS (Sky Islands)

Edward Manuga, Georgianna Lepping, Jeremy Gwao, Regina Lepping, Zahiyd Namo, Junior Patrick Makau, Manner Levo, Neil Nuia, Daniel Kakadi | 7:34

Decades of logging have drastically changed the landscape and lifestyle of those who call the Solomon Islands home. Now, the last untouched forest of the country is at risk of being lost.

Read the Filmmakers' bios

Zahiyd Namo is a photographer/filmmaker from the Solomon Islands. His work is inspired by everyday island life, telling authentic life stories of Pacific peoples through photography and film.

Regina Lepping (Solomon Islander) is an actor, youth advocate, filmmaker and activist. In 2016, Regina co-founded the Honiara Film Club, which was an initiative that brought to light issues of gender-based violence in the Solomon Islands. Her first breakout role was in the 2017 award winning short film Blackbird where she first became interested in scriptwriting. In November 2019, Regina and her twin sister Georgianna, launched the first ever Solomon Islands film festival called the NATIVE LENS FILM FESTIVAL to sold out audiences hailing from many provinces. In addition, they also decided to co-direct the first ever 48-hour film challenge on the islands. Her recent film about the biodiversity of the Solomons titled Sky Aelans will premiere at the Maoriland Film Festival in Aotearoa this March 2020.

Georgianna “Jojo” Lepping (Solomon Islander) is a filmmaker, activist, writer, and freelance media maker based in the Solomon Islands. From 2011-2019, Jojo worked as a radio announcer and journalist. In addition, she worked as a media freelancer in the fields of filmmaking and writing. In 2013, Jojo and her twin sister Regina, started their own communications and branding agency called Sparklens Freelance Company taking jobs in documentary film, event videography, magazine coverage, photography and podcasts. Recently, Jojo left a successful radio career to pursue filmmaking and festival programming full time beginning with a three-week documentary expedition which traveled to three rural provincial areas in Solomon’s as part of a cohort film collective. Their first short Sky Aelans will premiere March 2020 at the Maoriland Film Festival in Aotearoa.

Jeremy Gwao is a proud Solomon Islander. He is a young journalist with a vivid passion for photojournalism and filmmaking. His work as a photographer has led him to become recognized as one of British Council’s Top 100 Young Journalists Worldwide.

Edward Manuga is a Papua New Guinean/Solomon Islands based in Honiara, Solomon Islands. He is a passionate self-taught videographer and photographer. He recently joined OneMoreShot, a group of changemakers to inspire and make change in their local community. Edward’s work can be seen on his Facebook page Island Telegraph Pro.

Junior Patrick Kauha Makau hails from PNG and Solomon Islands. He is a freelance photographer based in Honiara. Junior uses his passion for photography to tell stories and to advocate about issues in Melanesia that often go unheard in order to make a change.

Mannar Levo is the lead cinematographer and editor for Levo Media and OneMoreShot Film makers. His work often centers on advocacy for the environment and culture in his community. He is the director of photography for Sky Aelans.

Neil Nuia is a creative director for Dreamcast Art Hub in the Solomon Islands. Neil is a photographer, film producer, and founder of PhotoUp Newlooks and OneMoreShot initiative.

Daniel Kakadi is a Solomon Islander based in Honiara. He works as a freelance photographer and filmmaker for the OneMoreShot team, a creative collective of passionate young changemakers in the Solomon Islands. His passion and focus is in telling the stories and the beauty the environment and culture in the Solomons and to advocate for change in his country.

Feature | Saturday, July 4 | 8:00pm

Another Scar of Genocide: Diabetes in Indian Country

Justin Deegan | 52:34

A documentary designed to bring awareness to the epidemic of diabetes throughout Indian Country.  Fashion designer Darlene Perkins of Red Lightning Couture uses her fashion shows as a vehicle to bring awareness to this serious Indigenou health crisis.  Her new found Indigenous celebrity alliances join her to raise awareness.

Read the Filmmaker's bio

Hi.  My name is, Justin Deegan, and I am a citizen of the Three Affiliated Tribes, from the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation. Home of the Mandan, Hidatsa & Arikara Nation.  I am Arikara, Oglala and Hunkpapa. I am a graduate from North Dakota State University, with a degree in Political Science.  And, I have always loved films.

Closing Night Feature | Sunday, July 5 | 6:00pm

maɬni – towards the ocean, towards the shore

Sky Hopinka | 80:16

Sky Hopinka’s mesmerizing feature weaves together the stories of Sweetwater Sahme and Jordan Mercier as they contemplate the afterlife, rebirth and the places in-between. Spoken mostly in chinuk wawa their stories are departures from the Chinookan origin of death myth, with its distant beginning and circular shape. An intense attention to detail punctuates Hopinka’s masterful and poetic journey, one that captures the timeless beauty of our natural world.

Read the Filmmaker's bio

Sky Hopinka (Ho-Chunk Nation/Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians) was born and raised in Ferndale, Washington and spent a number of years in Palm Springs and Riverside, California, Portland, Oregon, and is currently based out of Vancouver B.C. and Milwaukee, WI. In Portland he studied and taught chinuk wawa, a language indigenous to the Lower Columbia River Basin. His video, photo, and text work centers around personal positions of Indigenous homeland and landscape, designs of language as containers of culture expressed through personal, documentary, and non fiction forms of media. He received his BA from Portland State University in Liberal Arts and his MFA in Film, Video, Animation, and New Genres from the University of Wisconsin- Milwaukee and currently teaches at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, British Columbia.  His work has played at various festivals including ImagineNATIVE Media + Arts Festival, Images, Wavelengths, Ann Arbor Film Festival, Sundance, and Projections. His work was a part of the 2016 Wisconsin Triennial and the 2017 Whitney Biennial and the 2018 FRONT Triennial. He was a guest curator at the 2019 Whitney Biennial and was a part of Cosmopolis #2 at the Centre Pompidou. He was awarded jury prizes at the Onion City Film Festival, the More with Less Award at the 2016 Images Festival, the Tom Berman Award for Most Promising Filmmaker at the 54th Ann Arbor Film Festival, the New Cinema Award at the Berwick Film and Media Arts Festival and the Mary L. Nohl Fund Fellowship for Individual Artists in the Emerging artist category for 2018. He was a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University in 2018-2019 and Sundance Art of Nonfiction Fellow for 2019.

Read more about Sky Hopinka here

Lumbee Staff

Kim Pevia, Festival Director

Kim Pevia is an experienced life strategist, an engaging keynote speaker, and a skilled workshop facilitator. Her workshops are experiential and transformational. She specializes in identifying  the issues that keep us stuck and addresses them by developing a personalized toolbox to help us hurdle over them.  Her favorite work is done in circles.  Her favorite topics include Emotional intelligence, Gifts of Conflict, Impacts of Historical Trauma, Cultural Healing, Innocuous Nature of Fear, most of which she includes in Race, Equity and Inclusion work.  Born and educated in Baltimore, MD she currently lives in Robeson County, NC where her roots run deep as a member of the Lumbee Tribe. 

She serves on many local, state and national boards that support community activism and local economy through arts, food, culture and tourism. She recently served as Chair of the Board of Alternate Roots.  In 2015 she founded Artist Market-Pembroke, providing retail opportunities for local and regional artists in southeast North Carolina. Her love of community and films is expressed as the curator of the annual Lumbee Film Festival (along with Cucalorus) and the quarterly CommUnity Cinema (in partnership with Working Films). She expresses her creativity as a writer and workshop/training facilitator.

Chad Locklear, Communications Director

Chad Locklear was born (and still lives) in St. Pauls, NC. He is the director of marketing for the Givens Performing Arts Center at UNC Pembroke. In 2015, Chad organized the 4th River People Music Festival, which highlighted local and national American Indian musicians. He also performed at numerous venues as a member of the traditional native group, the Deer Clan Singers. His previous work was in journalism and graphic design at UNC Wilmington and the Fayetteville Observer. Chad earned a graduate degree in liberal studies from UNC Wilmington and bachelor’s degrees in communication and art studies from N.C. State University. He is currently pursuing an M.A. in digital communications at UNC-Chapel Hill’s Hussman School of Journalism & Media. 

Read More about the Second Annual Lumbee Film Festival in 2019

 

Here’s the full schedule of 2019 films:

 

Thursday, May 16

5:30 PM: Shorts / 47:23

Telling People You’re Native American When You’re Not… / Joey Clift / 2:02

Shiny Object / Kevin Tikivik / 5:00

Lumbee Art Legacy / Landon Oxendine / 6:34

Raven Goes Fishing / Daniel Foreman / 9:26

Gʷidəq (Geoduck) / Tracy Rector / 6:13

Gutk’odau (Yellow) / Adam Piron / 8:24

The Violence of a Civilization without Secrets / Adam Khalil, Zack Khalil, Jackson Polys / 9:44

 

7:30 PM: Feature / 85:00

Words from a Bear (Kiowa) / Jeffrey Palmer / 85:00

 

Friday, May 17 

5:30 PM: Shorts / 49:43

Shell No / Tracy Rector / 6:52

Inuk Hunter / George Annanack / 4:05

What Lumbee Means to My Family / Evan Ramseur / 7:56

A History of Service (Auburn Veterans) / Tracy Rector / 4:23

Maintaining Cultural Identity as Lumbee Women / Reagan Cummings / 7:09

Mommy goes race / Charlene McConini / 5:50

Sweetheart Dancers / Ben-Alex Dupris / 13:28

 

7:30 PM: Feature / 90:00

Kayak to Klemtu / Zoe Hopkins / 90:00

Read More about the First Annual Lumbee Film Festival in 2018

Read Festival Director Kim Pevia’s interview with the Fayetteville Observer. 

The First Ever Lumbee Film Festival took place on June 23rd, 2018 from 3 to 9 p.m. in the Thomas Family Entrepreneurship Center on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Pembroke, 202 Main St. in Pembroke. The highlight of the festival was a 7 p.m. screening of “Warrior Women,” directed by Christina D. King and Elizabeth A. Castle. The film tells the story of the American Indian movement from the perspective of Madonna Thunder Hawk of the Oohenumpa Lakota tribe. Thunder Hawk and King attended the festival to discuss the film.

Here’s the full schedule of 2018 films:

3pm: Shorts Block

Real Indian / Malinda Maynor Lowery
After All / Brannigan Carter
Get Up / Brannigan Carter
Creation & Hope / Keith Carter, Gia Kereselidze
Ohero:kon / Katsitsionni Fox
Water Warriors / Michael Premo

4:30pm: Panel Discussion
Who Tells Our Stories: Extraction and Appropriation in Indigenous Communities
Featuring community organizers, filmmakers and tribe members discussing cultural extraction, cultural appropriation, and other issues faced by indigenous communities and their work within the cultural sector.

5:30pm: Grand Opening Celebration
Launching the Lumbee Film Festival: Reception with refreshments and special guests

7pm: Feature Film
Warrior Women, directed by Christina D. King and Elizabeth A. Castle
featuring Special Guest Madonna Thunder Hawk
Screens with: Lumbee Spring Moon Powwow / John “ManiQ” Whittemore

**Films from the Lumbee Filmmaking Challenge were shared at both screenings**

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